Craig Resnick of the ARC Advisory Group shared his insights on how to eliminate unplanned downtime and future-proof automation system assets in a recent webinar. The webinar reviewed the ever-present consequences that can occur from unplanned downtime and some of the leading causes. Strategies to reduce unplanned downtime through implementing updated SCADA systems and using technologies such as virtualization and fault-tolerant computers were discussed, as well as how organizations can leverage those strategies to prepare for the coming wave IIoT.

Here’s a summary of the key take-aways:

  • Understanding the true impact of unplanned downtime can lead to a better understanding of where investments can be made in automation systems to reduce such events.
  • Unplanned downtime can occur from a variety of areas, including human errors, failure of assets that are not part of the direct supervisory and control chain, and failure of the SCADA systems themselves. The result is lowered OEE, decreased efficiency and reduced profitability.
  • Adopting standards-based platforms and implementing technologies such as virtualization can consolidate SCADA server infrastructure and deliver a range of benefits, such as simplified management, easy testing and upgrading of existing and new applications and preparation for the IIoT.
  • When virtualizing it is important to understand that you need to protect your server assets, as moving everything to a single virtualized platform means that everything fails if the platform fails. There are various strategies to prevent this, but it is important to ensure that you don’t swap the complexity of a single server per application for a complex failure recovery mechanism in a virtualized environment.
  • Fault-tolerant platforms are a key way to avoid this complexity, delivering simplicity and reliability in virtualized implementations, eliminating unplanned downtime and preventing data loss – a critical element in many automation environments, and essential for IIoT analytics. It is important to note that disaster recovery should not be confused with fault-tolerance. DR provides geographic redundancy in case of catastrophic failures, but will not prevent some downtime of data loss. In fact fault-tolerance and DR are complementary and they are often implemented together.
  • IIoT is driving OT and IT together so it is important to understand the priorities of each organization. In fact, OT & IT share a lot of common ground when it comes to key issues and this is a good starting point to cooperate in the move towards IIoT. Common requirements include no unscheduled downtime, cyber-security, the need for scalable and upgradeable systems and applications, as well as measurable increases in ROI, ROA and KPI’s. Last but not least is future-proofing systems and preparation for future IIoT applications.

This webinar is a good way to start the process of looking into what needs to be considered for upgrading and modernizing automation compute assets, using technologies such as virtualization and fault tolerance, as the industry evolves to increased levels of efficiency and moves towards implementing IIoT.
Watch the webinar

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